STEM Learning For the Culture

STEM Learning For the Culture

You can read the full article here!


As I scroll through Mashable while on The Music City Start to get to work I come across an article about how Dirtbikes can be used to promote STEM learning in the Black Youth in Baltimore especially black girls. The article centers around Brittany Young who is the founder of Social Entrepreneurial company called B-360. B-360 is an enterprise that uses the passion of dirt biking to create a pathway for the black youth to make their way into a field of STEM. Young grew up on the Baltimore street where people fixed, built, and rode dirt bikes for fun but had the risk of misdemeanors as it was not legal to ride dirt bikes there. Young found a way to hopefully change perceptions.


Brittany Young wanted help diversify the heavily white male dominated field of STEM. As STEM professional herself, she took it upon herself to create B-360. That is how she met Kamiya, the 12 year old model for the 3D printed statues created to show the power if how your passion can become your profession. Young loved seeing the amount of black girls interested in her workshops. Is this how we can get our youth to find the fields of STEM interesting again?


I think this is one of the many ways to get our youth interested in these fields. As technology keeps changing, our community should too! I think the way to do it is change how we get interested in subjects through our passions! Using the dirt bike is great because kids in these communities can learn about mechanics, engineering, robotics through something they love as hobby. I think this how we get kids invested in subjects like those by making it relatable/obtainable. Immersing in kids in these field through their interest is the best way to start to get them in these growing fields. Whether it’s working dirt bikes or building computers, creating a path that is based on passions or interests can be beneficial for creating a diversified


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